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Supreme Court Appointment Process PDF
Author: Congressional Service
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781722360610
Size: 72.64 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 30
View: 473

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Supreme Court Appointment Process

by Congressional Service, Supreme Court Appointment Process Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Supreme Court Appointment Process books, The appointment of a Supreme Court Justice is an event of major significance in American politics. Each appointment is of consequence because of the enormous judicial power the Supreme Court exercises as the highest appellate court in the federal judiciary. Appointments are usually infrequent, as a vacancy on the nine-member Court may occur only once or twice, or never at all, during a particular President's years in office. Under the Constitution, Justices on the Supreme Court receive what can amount to lifetime appointments which, by constitutional design, helps ensure the Court's independence from the President and Congress. The procedure for appointing a Justice is provided for by the Constitution in only a few words. The "Appointments Clause" (Article II, Section 2, clause 2) states that the President "shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint ... Judges of the supreme Court." The process of appointing Justices has undergone changes over two centuries, but its most basic feature-the sharing of power between the President and Senate-has remained unchanged: To receive appointment to the Court, a candidate must first be nominated by the President and then confirmed by the Senate. Political considerations typically play an important role in Supreme Court appointments. It is often assumed, for example, that Presidents will be inclined to select a nominee whose political or ideological views appear compatible with their own. The political nature of the appointment process becomes especially apparent when a President submits a nominee with controversial views, there are sharp partisan or ideological differences between the President and the Senate, or the outcome of important constitutional issues before the Court is seen to be at stake. Additionally, over more than two centuries, a recurring theme in the Supreme Court appointment process has been the assumed need for professional excellence in a nominee. During recent presidencies, nominees have at the time of nomination, most often, served as U.S. appellate court judges. The integrity and impartiality of an individual have also been important criteria for a President when selecting a nominee for the Court. The speed by which a President selects a nominee for a vacancy has varied during recent presidencies. A President might announce his intention to nominate a particular individual within several days of when a vacancy becomes publicly known, or a President might take multiple weeks or months to announce a nominee. The factors affecting the speed by which a President selects a nominee include whether a President had advance notice of a Justice's plan to retire, as well as when during the calendar year a Justice announces his or her departure from the Court. On rare occasions, Presidents also have made Court appointments without the Senate's consent, when the Senate was in recess. Such "recess appointments," however, were temporary, with their terms expiring at the end of the Senate's next session. Recess appointments have, at times, been considered controversial because they bypassed the Senate and its "advice and consent" role. The last recess appointment to the Court was made in 1958 when President Eisenhower appointed Potter Stewart as an Associate Justice (Justice Stewart was confirmed by the Senate the following year).


[PDF] Supreme Court Appointment Process Download

Supreme Court Appointment Process PDF
Author: Denis Stevens Rutkus
Publisher: DIANE Publishing
ISBN: 1437931790
Size: 48.83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 60
View: 3252

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Supreme Court Appointment Process

by Denis Stevens Rutkus, Supreme Court Appointment Process Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Supreme Court Appointment Process books, Contents: (1) Pres. Selection of a Nominee: Senate Advice; Advice from Other Sources; Criteria for Selecting a Nominee; Background Invest.; Recess Appoint. to the Court; (2) Consid. by the Senate Judiciary Comm.: Background: Senators Nominated to the Court; Open Hear.; Nominee Appear. at Confirm. Hear.; Comm. Involvement in Appoint. Process; Pre-Hearing Stage; Hearings; Reporting the Nomin.; (3) Senate Debate and Confirm. Vote; Bringing Nomin. to the Floor; Evaluate Nominees; Filibusters and Motions to End Debate; Voice Votes, Roll Calls, and Vote Margins; Reconsid. of the Confirm. Vote; Nomin. That Failed to be Confirmed; Judiciary Comm. to Further Examine the Nomin.; After Senate Confirm.


[PDF] Supreme Court Nominations Download

Supreme Court Nominations PDF
Author: Denis Steven Rutkus
Publisher: TheCapitol.Net Inc
ISBN: 1587332248
Size: 76.91 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 208
View: 2507

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Supreme Court Nominations

by Denis Steven Rutkus, Supreme Court Nominations Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Supreme Court Nominations books, This volume explores the Supreme Court Justice appointment process--from Presidential announcement, Judiciary Committee investigation, confirmation hearings, vote, and report to the Senate, through Senate debate and vote on the nomination.


[PDF] Supreme Court Appointment Process Download

Supreme Court Appointment Process PDF
Author: Denis Steven Rutkus
Publisher: Nova Publishers
ISBN: 9781594547119
Size: 65.53 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 74
View: 823

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Supreme Court Appointment Process

by Denis Steven Rutkus, Supreme Court Appointment Process Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Supreme Court Appointment Process books, The appointment of a Supreme Court Justice is an infrequent event of major significance in American politics. Each appointment is important because of the enormous judicial power the Supreme Court exercises as the highest appellate court in the federal judiciary. Appointments are infrequent, as a vacancy on the nine member Court may occur only once or twice, or never at all, during a particular President's years in office. Under the Constitution, Justices on the Supreme Court receive lifetime appointments. Such job security in the government has been conferred solely on judges and, by constitutional design, helps insure the Court's independence from the President and Congress. The procedure for appointing a Justice is provided for by the Constitution in only a few words. The "Appointments Clause" (Article II, Section 2, clause 2) states that the President "shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint ... Judges of the Spreme Court." The process of appointing Justices has undergone changes over two centuries, but its most basic feature -- the sharing of power between the President and Senate -- has remained unchanged: To receive lifetime appointment to the Court, a candidate must first be nominated by the President and then confirmed by the Senate. Although not mentioned in the Constitution, an important role is played midway in the process (after the President selects, but before the Senate considers) by the Senate Judiciary Committee. On rare occasions, Presidents also have made Court appointments without the Senate's consent, when the Senate was in recess. Such "recess appointments," however, were temporary, with their terms expiring at the end of the Senate's next session. The last recess appointments to the Court, made in the 1950s, were controversial, because they bypassed the Senate and its "advice and consent" role. The appointment of a Justice might or might not proceed smoothly. Since the appointment of the first Justices in 1789, the Senate has confirmed 120 Supreme Court nominations out of 154 received. Of the 34 unsuccessful nominations, 11 were rejected in Senate roll-call votes, while nearly all of the rest, in the face of committee or Senate opposition to the nominee or the President, were withdrawn by the President or were postponed, tabled, or never voted on by the Senate. Over more than two centuries, a recurring theme in the Supreme Court appointment process has been the assumed need for excellence in a nominee. However, politics also has played an important role in Supreme Court appointments. The political nature of the appointment process becomes especially apparent when a President submits a nominee with controversial views, there are sharp partisan or ideological differences between the President and the Senate, or the outcome of important constitutional issues before the Court is seen to be at stake.


[PDF] Supreme Court Appointment Process Download

Supreme Court Appointment Process PDF
Author: McMillion
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 42.64 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 32
View: 1863

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Supreme Court Appointment Process

by McMillion, Supreme Court Appointment Process Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Supreme Court Appointment Process books, The appointment of a Supreme Court Justice is an event of major significance in American politics. Each appointment is of consequence because of the enormous judicial power the Supreme Court exercises as the highest appellate court in the federal judiciary. To receive appointment to the Court, a candidate must first be nominated by the President and thenconfirmed by the Senate. Although not mentioned in the Constitution, an important role is played midway in the process (after the President selects, but before the Senate considers) by the Senate Judiciary Committee. Specifically, the Judiciary Committee, rather than the Senate as a whole, assumes the principal responsibility for investigating the background and qualifications of each Supreme Court nominee, and typically the committee conducts a close, intensive investigation ofeach nominee.


[PDF] Pursuit Of Justices Download

Pursuit of Justices PDF
Author: David Alistair Yalof
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226945460
Size: 50.47 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 296
View: 5941

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Pursuit Of Justices

by David Alistair Yalof, Pursuit Of Justices Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Pursuit Of Justices books, Yalof takes the reader behind the scenes of what happens before the Senate hearings to show how presidents decide who will sit on the highest court in the land. He draws on the papers of 7 modern presidents and firsthand interviews with key figures.


[PDF] Supreme Court Appointments Download

Supreme Court Appointments PDF
Author: Norman Vieira
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 9780809322046
Size: 17.39 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 310
View: 5849

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Supreme Court Appointments

by Norman Vieira, Supreme Court Appointments Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Supreme Court Appointments books, Norman Vieira and Leonard Gross provide an in-depth analysis of the political and legal framework surrounding the confirmation process for Supreme Court nominees. President Ronald Reagan's nomination of Judge Robert Bork to the Supreme Court met with a fierce opposition that was apparent in his confirmation hearings, which were different in many ways from those of any previous nominee. This behind-the-scenes view of the politics and personalities involved in the Bork confirmation controversy provides a framework for future debates regarding the confirmation process. To help establish that framework, Vieira and Gross examine the similarities as well as the differences between the Bork confirmation battle and other confirmation proceedings for Supreme Court nominees.


[PDF] The Selling Of Supreme Court Nominees Download

The Selling of Supreme Court Nominees PDF
Author: John Anthony Maltese
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801858833
Size: 19.10 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 216
View: 4203

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The Selling Of Supreme Court Nominees

by John Anthony Maltese, The Selling Of Supreme Court Nominees Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download The Selling Of Supreme Court Nominees books, Politics has always been at the heart of the Supreme Court selection process. According to John Anthony Maltese, the first "Borking" of a nominee came in 1795 with the defeat of John Rutledge's nomination as chief justice. What is different about today's appointment process, he argues, is not its politicization but the range of players involved and the political techniques that they use. In The Selling of Supreme Court Nominees, Maltese traces the evolution of the contentious and controversial confirmation process awaiting today's nominees to the nation's highest court. In this paperback edition, he includes a discussion of the recent nomination of Stephen Breyer, addressing various reform proposals made by critics of the current process and crediting President Clinton's protracted selection process with restoring some decorum to the proceedings.


[PDF] Supreme Court Nominations Download

Supreme Court Nominations PDF
Author: Betsy Palmer
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781606926543
Size: 46.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Judges
Languages : en
Pages : 256
View: 4761

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Supreme Court Nominations

by Betsy Palmer, Supreme Court Nominations Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Supreme Court Nominations books, The appointment of a Supreme Court Justice is an event of major significance in American politics. Each appointment is important because of the enormous judicial power the Supreme Court exercises as the highest appellate court in the federal judiciary. Appointments are usually infrequent, as a vacancy on the nine member Court may occur only once or twice, or never at all, during a particular President's years in office. Under the Constitution, Justices on the Supreme Court receive lifetime appointments. Such job security in the government has been conferred solely on judges and, by constitutional design, helps insure the Court's independence from the President and Congress. The procedure for appointing a Justice is provided for by the Constitution in only a few words. The "Appointments Clause" (Article II, Section 2, clause 2) states that the President "shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint . . . Judges of the supreme Court." The process of appointing Justices has undergone changes over two centuries, but its most basic feature -- the sharing of power between the President and Senate -- has remained unchanged: To receive lifetime appointment to the Court, a candidate must first be nominated by the President and then confirmed by the Senate. Although not mentioned in the Constitution, an important role is played midway in the process (after the President selects, but before the Senate considers) by the Senate Judiciary Committee. On rare occasions, Presidents also have made Court appointments without the Senate's consent, when the Senate was in recess. Such "recess appointments," however, were temporary, with their terms expiring at the end of the Senate's next session. The last recess appointments to the Court, made in the 1950s, were controversial because they bypassed the Senate and its "advice and consent" role. The appointment of a Justice might or might not proceed smoothly. From the first appointments in 1789, the Senate has confirmed 122 out of 158 Court nominations. Of the 36 unsuccessful nominations, 11 were rejected in Senate roll-call votes, while nearly all of the rest, in the face of committee or Senate opposition to the nominee or the President, were withdrawn by the President or were postponed, tabled, or never voted on by the Senate. Over more than two centuries, a recurring theme in the Supreme Court appointment process has been the assumed need for excellence in a nominee. However, politics also has played an important role in Supreme Court appointments. The political nature of the appointment process becomes especially apparent when a President submits a nominee with controversial views, there are sharp partisan or ideological differences between the President and the Senate, or the outcome of important constitutional issues before the Court is seen to be at stake.